Oct
2012

The Greek word anakupto

Found just four times in the New Testament (Lk. 13:11; 21:28Lk. 13:11; 21:28
English: American Standard Version (1901) - ASV

11 And behold, a woman that had a spirit of infirmity eighteen years; and she was bowed together, and could in no wise lift herself up. 28 But when these things begin to come to pass, look up, and lift up your heads; because your redemption draweth nigh.

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; Jn. 8:7, 10Jn. 8:7, 10
English: American Standard Version (1901) - ASV

7 But when they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said unto them, He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her. 10 And Jesus lifted up himself, and said unto her, Woman, where are they? did no man condemn thee?

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), the Greek verb “anakupto” describing “looking up” or lifting oneself.

Luke (13:11) described a woman who was too ill to “lift herself.”  Jesus used this word when discussing the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. (Lk. 21:28Lk. 21:28
English: American Standard Version (1901) - ASV

28 But when these things begin to come to pass, look up, and lift up your heads; because your redemption draweth nigh.

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).  This word is also associated with John’s discussion of the woman caught in the act of adultery (Jn. 8:7, 10Jn. 8:7, 10
English: American Standard Version (1901) - ASV

7 But when they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said unto them, He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her. 10 And Jesus lifted up himself, and said unto her, Woman, where are they? did no man condemn thee?

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).